Sutton Hoo display at the British Museum

Display case with helmets and shield

Ship burial from Sutton Hoo redisplayed

The Sutton Hoo ship burial and the dark ages artefacts found there have fascinated many of us from first sight. The full face helmet alone is an amazing object in its own right.  The other treasures create an impression of wealth not normally associated with the popular idea of the Anglo-Saxons in the dark ages.

Three silver plates from the Mediterranean

Silver plates from the Mediterranean

The recent redisplay of the Sutton Hoo discoveries at the British Museum shows the objects familiar to frequent visitors in a new setting and with new interpretation. What I liked most about the redisplay was the context given to the finds. The display case is long and tall with the outline of a ship in white. The photo shows this is faint but helps remind visitors that the objects come from a ship grave. This is underlined by the simple labels showing whereabouts in the ship the objects were found.

Sutton Hoo display case

Centre of the new Sutton Hoo display case

Interpretation panel showing the ship

Panel showing where objects were in the ship

Recreated objects and interpretation

A big change in this display is the number of modern recreations of objects displayed alongside the originals. I liked this approach because it helps the non-specialist understand what the original looked like and can help see how it was used. For example the modern versions of the cauldron and chain make it clear the size of the object and it’s use. Not least the length of the chain shows it was hung from a high support. I also liked the way the modern versions were clearly marked to avoid confusion.

Cauldron and chain display

Modern cauldron and chain beside original chain

Inevitably the modern helmet attracted most attention while I was in the gallery. Having it displayed by the original allows a compare and contrast the two. Plus it shows how much the Anglo-Saxons liked to create an impression with polished metal objects.

Modern version of the helmet

Modern reconstruction of the Sutton Hoo helmet

The reconstructed helmet has more detailed interpretation than I expected. It highlights the pagan horned dancing figures similar to other pagan depictions. It also points out the similarity to Roman cavalry tombstones that show a Roman (or auxiliary) riding down a barbarian.

Dancing figures on a helmet panel

Dancing figures on the modern helmet

Helmet panel with Roman style horseman

Modern helmet panel showing horseman riding down an enemy

The shield was a reconstruction to provide a display for the original shield fittings and this is essentially unchanged. It has a modern and an original sword below it. Seeing the modern sword in pristine condition helps the visitor imagine the impact visually and physically of this finely made weapons.

Shield and swords display

Modern shield with original fittings and modern and original swords

Sutton Hoo and the Anglo-Saxons

What does this splendid display tell us about the Anglo-Saxons and their world? It makes clear the wealth that an individual could command. From gold metalwork and red garnet fittings on the pouch cover to the workmanship of the helmet’s decorated panel and ridge it shows the love of bling and display. Identifying where objects come from gives an insight into the wider world of the time. Clear links between East Anglia and East Sweden are seen along with silver plate from the Mediterranean (more dark ages bling!).

The discovery is significant enough to feature in the name of Room 41 at the British Museum. Room 41 is now the Sutton Hoo and Europe, AD 300-1100 gallery.

 

 

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About Rick Lawrence

Making models and playing tabletop games since the late 1960s, and still enjoying it! Now working in heritage and dabbing around with photography, with quality cafe time when I can.

One response to “Sutton Hoo display at the British Museum”

  1. simonjkyte says :

    I agree with the Swedish connection – I don’t like the terminology ‘Anglo-Saxon’ anymore

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