Tag Archive | 10mm

Goblins for Warmaster and BOFA

Only 10mm high but hordes of them

Older gamers will recognise Warmaster as Games Workshop’s mass fantasy battle rules from 2000. BOFA stands for Battle of Five Armies which was the later Hobbit version.  Both games use bases of 10mm metal or plastic figures based in elements on 20x40mm bases, with three such bases forming a unit. 

The  goblin horde arrayed

The goblin horde arrayed

I was painting the goblins from the Battle of Five Armies box set. This produces eight units to make the goblin army. That’s a total of 336 (8 times 3 bases each with 14 goblins on) 1cm high goblins to paint!

Fast painting hordes of goblins

I wanted to get these painted quickly because of the number of them. Plus I have another eight units to paint! I tried two techniques. 

First was the traditional black undercoat to provide dramatic shading and lining. This creates almost a cartoon effect and by dotting in glowing red eyes worked well. 

Goblin unit painted with a black undercoat

Goblin unit painted with a black undercoat

Second was using a coloured acrylic varnish produced by Ronseal for treating wood over bases colours. This is the same as the technique known as the “the dip”. 

Goblin unit  painted with brown wood varnish

Goblin unit painted with brown wood varnish

Of the two I decided the starker black undercoat worked best. Especially when viewed from a distance as on the games table. And it seems quicker too. 

The full horde seen from above

The full horde seen from above

   
 

Paddling in the North American Wilderness

… and not in canoes!

I finished this last batch of Indian Allies for my British in North America some time ago. Having caught up with the rest of my life I am catching up with blogging!

Indian Allies - marsh basing

Indian Allies - marsh basing

Come on in, the water is sticky

Using the water effect was nice and easy. It poured out smoothly with no sudden surges. Well, years of pouring ales and wines may have helped here! Once in place there were some small bubbles.

Getting rid of these with a pin, as I have done with resin casting in the past, was not a good idea. I actually split some bubbles into two! I switched to using an old paint brush and just brushed them out without any problems.

The verdict is I like this product and found it straightforward to use with a little care. I got mine from Maelstrom with some other odds and ends, so I got a discount and post free.

Rear view of marsh basing

Rear view of marsh basing

That’s enough of those native chaps for now

I have now finished the three units I planned.  Hopefully the idea of using a different theme on each unit’s bases will let me recognise them on the table top. The photo below should demonstrate the theory!

Three units of English Indian allies

Three units of English Indian allies

Our native allies in America

A big bag of them, Sir!

Not exactly thousands of them but a bag of 50 Old Glory 10mm American Revolution Indians supplied by Caliver. I decided to use Old Glory so the British native allies would look different to the French. I plan to use Pendraken Indians for my French forces. So it was open the bag, clean up the figures, and paint!

Both units arrayed in depth

Both units arrayed in depth

How was it for you Hiawatha?

I have painted 30mm Indians for this period and found tattoos and war paint a mixture of fun and frustration.  On these wee fellows the smaller scale let me use the daub technique to give a quick impression of warpaint. That’s the aim anyway! I enjoyed painting these although one or two figures have very over scale muskets. I would recommend considering them for any North American eighteenth century conflict.

Sharp eyed readers will see I have used a Pendraken British officer to further identify these figures as British allies.

One from another

Eventually I will have three units of these chaps. So how to tell them apart?

Clever micro painting with distinctive war paint could be one approach. I wanted something I can see when standing or sitting at the table so testing my badger paws painting technique to the limit was not the answer. I settled on making each unit’s basing distinctive. The result is one unit with a plain base using just some Gale Force 9 forest flock supplied by Maelstrom Games, a second using Woodland Scenics twigs from a model shop, and the third one will appear in a later entry! You can judge the effectiveness of this plan from the image below.

Looking down to see the difference in basing

Looking down to see the difference in basing

The flock and twigs were anchored with a mix of PVA glue and paint. The twigs were painted and washed with acrylics. The end result was then sprayed with Testor’s Dullcote – once we had a warm and dry enough day!

French-Indian War 10mm 80th Foot

80th What?

The 80th Regiment of foot were one of several regiments used as light infantry in the French-Indian War. They adapted their uniform to the North American woods by cutting down their tricorns to caps, carrying light equipment, and abandoning the standard close order formation for a light infantry one.

80th foot whole battalion

80th foot whole battalion

Light infantry here means a looser formation but still fighting very much as a unit. The emphasis seems to have been on faster movement and flexibility, rather than skirmishing as individuals.

The 80th had various uniforms during this campaign and I have gone for the brown uniform that is classicaly associated with them. I have add some standard issue red trousers for variety. For more on this regiment and campaign see the Seven Years War Project page

How were these tiny dudes done?

80th foot side view of an element

80th foot side view of an element

These are Pendraken 10mm and I find they are well cast and easy to clean up. After preparation I sprayed them with a white undercoat. I used various acrylic paints and a Citadel brown wash over the warmer and brighter colours. Flesh is a mix of a tanned and pale tone to give an outdoor European base coat. Colours such as green and blue were a base coat followed by a darker wash.

Finished off with a polyurethane satin varnish for protection. I used Flames of War plastic bases with magnetic stickies to keep figures secure and safe when carting them about. They were based in my usual way and then finished with Testor’s dull coat varnish.

A note on rules and basing

These figures are part of my French-Indian War project. The plan is to paint enough figures to have a reasonable sized engagement on my dining table. Using 10mm figures helps here! Another strand of the plan is to use Piquet Field of Battle rules and this is why I have based the figures as four elements.

Always believing in having a plan B, I can use just three elements with Eighteenth Century Principles of War if Field of Battle proves not to my taste. Observant and informed readers will note that the bases are deeper than Principles of War specifies. This is simply becasue I like the ready made bases and the zone of control effect a deeper base gives. Oh, and more figures per base with space for odd terrain bits.

80th foot command element

80th foot command element

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